Dragon Hunting

Last Wednesday, I had the distinct pleasure of leading Phyllis and Justin on a Dragon Hunting adventure.

Justin and Phyllis - Dragon Hunters

They were in town from Oregon… quite a long way from here!  Originally, they had signed up for an Elderhostel intergenerational program we offer, but the June offering had to be cancelled.  They were the only ones signed up, unfortunately.  Not easily deterred, the adventurous pair did not cancel their travel plans.  So, off we went… the hunt was on!

Our first find (other than the ubiquitous Eastern Forktail) was a pretty little Slender SpreadwingSlender Spreadwing
Spreadwings are a kind of damselfly.  The Slender Spreadwing male is quite lovely: blue eyes, greenish shoulder stripes, lemon yellow under his thorax, metallic bronzy-green abdomen.  With spreadwings, to provide positive identification for the NYS Survey, you need to photograph the terminal appendage.

Slender Spreadwing Terminal Appendage

Justin learned quickly the safe way to handle these beauties, Justin Investigates Slender Spreadwing
and it wasn’t long before he got the knack of capturing them in his aerial net.

For most of the other species we found the NYS scientists require nothing more than an observation because the field marks are so distinctive it is difficult to confuse them for anything else. We captured them and photographed them nonetheless, just for fun.

Blue Dasher (male)
Blue Dasher

Eastern Pondhawk (male)
Eastern Pondhawk Male

Twelve-spotted Skimmer (female)
Twelve-spotted Skimmer Female

Common Whitetail (male)
Common Whitetail Male
This is the third year of the survey. I’ve seen plenty of Common Whitetails in a variety of habitats. I have never been able to net one, nor had anyone in my group that has netted one. But Justin did! Way to go, Justin!

Dot-tailed Whiteface (male)
Dot-tailed Whiteface

Face to Face with a Dot-tailed WhitefaceIt was a great day and I will file two official datasheets, as we visited two separate sites on the Audubon property.  I will also (eventually) log the two site surveys at my Odonata blog, which you can see by clicking here.


Dragons weren’t our only finds…

Check out this awesome caterpillar that Phyllis found.  I think it’s one of the Checkerspots:

Caterpillar

I kept spotting little grasshoppers when I was looking for dragons:Little Grasshopper

We stopped to check out the owl pellet and found this tiny jawbone:
Tiny Jaw Bone

It was great spending a couple of hours with this curious pair of visitors.  Justin, it was great to meet you.  You are a very delightful person and you have a really cool grandma.  Phyllis, it was great to meet you.  You’re doing a great thing with your grandkids.  I can STILL remember a trip I took with my grandma when I was but FIVE years old.  I didn’t get to meet Emily, but if she is as grateful as Justin, it must be a joy to spend time with her, too.

Happy travels!


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4 thoughts on “Dragon Hunting

  1. Pingback: Pages tagged "delightful"

  2. Great pictures throughout. I’ve been thinking of getting a net to try to get some of those dragons which are harder to get while they are perched (spot-winged gliders, wander gliders, etc.), but need to get someone to teach me how to do that and ‘chill’ them properly – I don’t want to hurt them.

    Have any contacts in this area (Philly) that do that you could let me know about?

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