Abstract

Many thanks to all my blog friends who gave feedback on my photography assignment. I’ll be making the final cuts and edits over the next week… You all helped me a great deal and I appreciate it!  I made a couple of posts over on my art class blog with some of the suggestions you all made:


While shooting photos for my class, I became fascinated with rust on the side of an abandoned sheep-dipping wagon.

Sheep Wagon 00

Sheep Wagon 08

Can You Guess What it is?

Sheep Wagon 09

I didn’t know it was a sheep-dipping wagon until later when I talked to the farmer whose property I was on… I didn’t know what sheep-dipping was until he explained… I guess I’m just a city girl…

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OK, I’ve taken enough photos for Project #2… (never!!!) I’m only allowed to turn in 10.

Now, to cull… to find the ones that have artistic merit, but also help convey the idea that when man pushes on nature, nature pushes back

Any help you want to give would be greatly appreciated! Go to any of these pages and leave comments about photos that really caught your eye. Most will need some post-processing – your suggestions on that also appreciated! Would some look better in Black and White? Cropped differently? Whatever…

Thanks in advance for your help!

Long Point State Park

Went over to Long Point with Maddie. She wanted to watch the Cross Country race and cheer her friends who were running. She invited me, knowing I “need” to take photos… (Now I can call it homework for class!)

Not all of these (perhaps none of them?) are for my class… but here are a few shots from around the park:

Through the Trees to the Lake

Oak Leaf in the Grass

Another Monarch

Mooring

Red Leaf

My Job Rocks

Sometimes, my job just totally rocks:

Tagged and ready for release!

I’m working with the 3rd graders at Fletcher Elementary School this year. Our first unit is butterflies. They will be raising the Painted Ladies that so many kids do, but in addition, they have a bunch of monarchs, too. (Thank you, Barb!!!)

So far, we have tagged and released 9 adults. There are lots more caterpillars and chrysalises in the classroom, so there will be plenty more that get tagged!

Clean Your Sensor!

Update 6:46pm: After reading Tom’s comment about it being sensor dust, I googled around about sensor cleaning. I think he’s right, so I edited this article. The original blamed dust on the lens.

I just spent hours cleaning up some photos I took at the beginning of the month. I was experimenting with some of the “stuff” I had learned in class and was setting my aperture manually to see the difference in the effects.

Before this experiment, I could tell you what was supposed to happen from what I had read: large aperture, shallow depth of field (small part of picture in focus)… small aperture, deep depth of field (large part of picture in focus). I took some shots at Griffis Sculpture Park that show this concept well.

With a wide open aperture (f4.0), I can choose to focus on the foreground:
Large Aperture 2

or the background:
Large Aperture 1

With a smaller aperture (f22), I can get both in focus:
Small Aperture

Now, back to my cleanup job. Do you notice in the last photo above there are spots in the sky. Apparently when you shoot with a small aperture, EVERYTHING is in focus: even the dirt on your sensor!

Here was another experiment in which I shot a broad landscape twice varying the aperture.

Here is aperture wide open (f4.0):
Scene2

Here is with a small aperture (f22):
Scene1

Once again, even the dirt on my sensor is in focus in the second photo shot with the small aperture. These examples also serve to demonstrate another factor that contributes to depth of field: distance from subject. The DOF is not affected that much when the subject is far from the lens. Both scenes seem to have an equivalent DOF.

Interestingly, I took my camera to have the sensor cleaned the day after I went to Griffis…  Now to perform the test suggested at the website below:

Here’s an article about sensor cleaning:
http://www.dmcphoto.com/Articles/SensorBrushes/